Saturday, February 24, 2007

Celebrate Black History Month By Accentuating the Positives

3:41 PM 0 Comments
Accentuating the Positives

“Originally established… 1926 by Carter G. Woodson, a noted African-American author and scholar, this event evolved into the establishment of February as Black History Month in 1976. This commemoration also has been referred to as African-American History Month. Both names are currently in use.

When Woodson established this… he realized the importance of providing a theme to focus the attention of the public. The intention never has been to dictate or limit the exploration of the Black experience, but to bring to the public's attention important developments that merit emphasis.

Since 1926,The Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History (ASALH) has established the national theme for the month long celebration. The National Theme for the celebration in the year 2007 is From Slavery to Freedom” (from US INFO)

From Slavery:
“Charleston, SC was the major point of entry for Africans brought to America in the eighteenth century. Approximately three out of four enslaved Africans came to America through this port city, which had a black majority by 1790. In 1808, the foreign slave trade was abolished, but American-born slaves continued to be bought and sold until the Civil War.” (from The Aiken-Rhett House )

1441
The first cargo of African slaves arrive in Lisbon with Antam Goncalves.
1690
February 7. The first South Carolina law relating solely to slavery is enacted.
1743
September 12. The Reverend Alexander Garden (d. 1773) opened a school for blacks in Charles Town. The purpose was to train them "in principles of Christianity and the fundamentals of education, to serve as schoolmasters to their people."
1773
A black Christian church opens in South Carolina, reflecting the rapid growth of Christianity, the "white man's religion," among American blacks.
1790 SC Federal Census
Slave 107,094
Free Black 1,801
1800 SC Federal Census
Slave 146,151
Free Black 3,18
1810 SC Federal Census
Slave 196,365
Free Black 4,554
1820 SC Federal Census
Slave 258,475
Free Black 6,826
1821
Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church on Calhoun Street was closed in response to the Vesey insurrection. Reorganized in 1865, it became a focal point for black political activity.
1829
Daniel A. Payne, a free black, opens a school for black children in Charleston.
1840 SC Federal Census
Slave 327,038
Free Black 8,276
1860 SC Federal Census
Slaves 402,406
Free Blacks 9,914
1861-1865
The Civil War: An estimated 250,000 African Americans, some of whom were slaves, serve as soldiers.
May 13 Robert Smalls, a black pilot, with a black crew sailed in the Confederate steamer Planter out of Charleston and joined the Union Fleet.
November The first black regiment was mustered into service in South Carolina. The First Regiment of South Carolina Volunteers was commanded by Colonel Thomas W. Higginson, a white man from Massachusetts. During the war over 5,000 black South Carolinians joined the Union Army.
June 2 Harriet Tubman leads Union troops in a raid up only time a woman has led American troops in battle.
1865
St. Mark's Episcopal Church, organized by a black congregation, is established in Charleston.
November 13 The Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, abolishing slavery throughout the United States, is ratified.

(the above time-line is from Milestones in the History of Slavery)

For a more details on slavery in Charleston, SC, “Follow the African American Coastal Heritage trails and explore what our ancestors never imagined would become history” at The African American Coastal Trail

To Freedom:
“Both free and enslaved Africans helped shape Charleston’s economic and cultural life. Their agricultural knowledge is largely responsible for Charleston’s success. Ironwork, handmade sweetgrass baskets, she-crab soup and benne seed cookies are just a few of the well-known artistic and culinary contributions. Gullah, the Sea Island culture and language, continues to survive today.” (Charleston Area Convention and Visitor Bureau)

Serving Our Nation
2.4 million
Number of black military veterans in the United States in 2005. More military veterans are black than any other minority group.
(Source: 2005 American Community Survey. Data pertain to blacks of one race only.)

Education
80%
Among blacks age 25 and older, the proportion that had at least a high school diploma in 2005. In states such as Colorado, the proportion was even higher – 90 percent. (Source: 2005 American Community Survey)
17%
Percentage of blacks age 25 and older who had a bachelor’s degree or more in 2005. In many states, the rate was higher. Twenty-six percent of blacks this age in Colorado, for instance, had this level of education. (Source: 2005 American Community Survey)
1.1 million
Among blacks age 25 and older, the number who had an advanced degree in 2005 (e.g., master’s, Ph.D., M.D. or J.D.). Ten years earlier — in 1995 — only 677,000 blacks had this level of education.
2.3 million
Number of black college students in fall 2004. This was an increase of roughly 1 million from 15 years earlier. U.S. U.S. Census Bureau

Businesses
$88.6 billion
Revenues for black-owned businesses in 2002, up 24 percent from 1997. The number of black-owned businesses totaled 1.2 million in 2002, up by 45 percent since 1997. Black-owned firms accounted for 5 percent of all nonfarm businesses in the United States.
129,329
The number of black-owned firms in New York in 2002, which led all states. New York City alone had 98,080 such firms, which led all cities.
10,716
The number of black-owned firms operating in 2002 with receipts of $1 million or more. These firms accounted for 1 percent of the total number of black-owned firms in 2002 and 55 percent of their total receipts, or $49 billion.
969
The number of black-owned firms with 100 or more employees in 2002. Firms of this size accounted for 24 percent of the total revenue for black-owned employer firms in 2002, or $16 billion.

Homeowership – the American Dream
46%
Nationally, the percentage of black households who lived in owner-occupied homes. The rate was higher in certain states, such as Mississippi, where it reached 56 percent.
(Source: 2005 American Community Survey)

Jobs
26%
The percentage of blacks age 16 and older who work in management, professional and related occupations. There are 44,000 black physicians and surgeons, 79,400 postsecondary teachers, 45,200 lawyers, and 49,300 chief executives. (Sources: 2005 American Community Survey and Upcoming Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2007, Table 602.)

For more information on the data in this section, see <http://www.census.gov/prod/ec02/sb0200csblk.pdf>

Please note that this is the “18th year BellSouth has spearheaded the initiative, providing educators, parents, and visitors a method of identifying African-American role models for all youth, honoring notable African-American achievers with ties to South Carolina” at BellSouth in South Carolina.

Honorees like Marjorie Amos-Frazier, “The first woman to be elected to the Charleston County Council in 1974, she went on to even greater triumphs six years later when she was elected commissioner on the South Carolina Public Service Commission. Until that time, the commission had been a bastion of the state's white male legislators.”


On a personal note, I would like to add; born in Ohio –I had many African American Friends whom my Family and I would share in the enjoyment of playing together, dining, church attendance, school activities, picnics, sports, etc. As a child I never knew the world had racial lines. It wasn’t until about 1975, age 13 when we moved to Beaufort, SC and I attended the school Robert Smalls that I first heard the word ‘riot’. Isn't it sad my Readers that throughout history, humans - with all our knowledgeable intelligence have been far crueler to our own humankind, than any beast? Yet, thankfully the human race continues to persevere. Maybe because there are enough individuals, or communities, or positive efforts … to really make a difference! So lets just keep doing the best we can, rather as individuals or together - for the greater plan – and in the process let us never forget our roots, no matter where they began - for they were the seedlings of today’s many dreams come true.

"All men and women are born, live suffer and die; what distinguishes us one from another is our dreams, whether they be dreams about worldly or unworldly things, and what we do to make them come about... We do not choose to be born. We do not choose our parents. We do not choose our historical epoch, the country of our birth, or the immediate circumstances of our upbringing. We do not, most of us, choose to die; nor do we choose the time and conditions of our death. But within this realm of choicelessness, we do choose how we live."
by Joseph Epstein

Saturday, February 17, 2007

Vanna White in Charleston SC, Who What Else!

8:29 PM 0 Comments
“This month, South Carolinians are the lucky ones, asWheel of Fortune comes to Charleston for a series of show tapings to honor the home state of Vanna White. Vanna, born in North Myrtle Beach, has been one of South Carolina’s most famous faces since she joined Wheel of Fortune in 1982.” (Source: SouthCarolina Magazine)

Black History Month -- February 2007: Charleston’s African-American Heritage Honored:

“National Black History month has a special significance in Charleston, SC. The historical influence of African Americans in the South Carolina Lowcountry is reflected in the culture and customs that still resonate throughout the area…” (Charleston Area Convention and Visitor Bureau),ABC News 4

“The only tennis tournament offering the top junior players the opportunity to compete for a wildcard invitation into a Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Tier I event will once again bring more than 400 regionally and nationally ranked juniors from 14 states (and Canada) to Charleston as SMASH Magazine presents the 6th annual SMASH Junior Cup on Daniel Island in Charleston, SC from February 23-26, 2007.” (Family Cirlce Cup)

Toy Soldier Show: 50 tables of new and antique toy soldiers, diorama supplies, and military books on sale and display. Sponsored by the South Carolina Military Miniatures Society. For more info call 795-8720:
Event Date Sat 3/3/07
Start Time 9:00 - 4:00
Location Patriots Pt Holiday Inn
Cost $3.00, children under 12 free accompanied by an adult
South Carolina Military Miniature Society)

Lynyrd Skynyrd & 38 Special show April 14th at the Ladson Fairgrounds!

From Charleston City Paper:
SOUTHERN ROCK FEST, The DJs at Q104.5 FM sure sound excited about what they're promoting as the Southern Rock Weekend at the Exchange Park Fairgrounds in Ladson in mid-April. In fact, the event is part of the annual Heritage Motorcycle Rally, which runs from April 12-22. Co-sponsored by Rock 104.5, the festival's main music lineup features Spartanburg's Marshall Tucker Band on Sat. April 14, the legendary Lynyrd Skynyrd and '80s rockers .38 Special on Sun. April 15. The following weekend features modern country act Montgomery Gentry on Fri. April 20 and Illinois classic rock band REO Speedwagon, with support from Smashmouth, on Sat. April 21. Advance tickets for Marshall Tucker are available for $20, while advance tickets for Skynyrd are available for $30 (both at www.etix.com). Check out www.heritagemotorcyclerally.com and www.q1045.com for more.”

100th Birthday celebration for oldest woman on Wadmalaw Island SC - Sun 4/15/07, this event is given by her children and grandchildren.

Stay posted my Readers for more Binding Ink! Thanks for Reading!

Saturday, February 10, 2007

What Is Noisette Blvd Harboring Now

7:50 AM 1 Comments
Exit the former Navy base, recently erected Riverfront Park – turn right onto N. Hobson Ave following the sharp left curve, then immediately yield right onto Noisette Blvd. Rapidly approach the set speed limit of 30 mph, You will near the road laden train tracks and cross a trendy fishing bridge. But just before you make the final jagged left curve headed toward Virginia Ave., be sure to look on the left hand side and you will surely see what appears to be a wooden tunnel from Maryland turnpike or perhaps some strange wooden garden green house. Across the enclosed fence you’ll note some strange almost village lettering, losttrades.com. Curious? I was! So naturally I went to the website. At first I was like - what does an odd shaped wooden doohickey have to do with film making? “Lost Trades is a collection of adventure based individuals with common goals: to bring about positive social and environmental change by building examples of human creativity, expeditioning to places of extreme beauty and documenting these voyages on film.” I began to explore some more and learned that Lost Trades is based on three Brothers from Woodstock, Vermont where the Brothers grew up in the mountains of New England. Somehow with only craftsmanship in their blood, a dream, and determination they came to Charleston, SC. July 2, 1999 on the Stono River, apparently on the old “Burnt Oak Plantation”; 9,000 hours invested - the three Brothers manual built ALLURA. A 50 ft. catamaran, 16,000 lbs. comprised of Okume Mahogany plywood and Douglas Fir, needing only 4 ft. of water when sailing. Certified for 77 passengers, the Brothers sailed the ALLURA to the Caribbean and started a day charter business.

Today, on Noisette Blvd. here in Charleston, SC is part of their GREENHORN BOAT SHOP. It is their MOBILE BOAT SHOP that they are able to pack up the entire warehouse and relocate to other 'port cities and coastal areas around the world.' Hence, the odd shaped tunnel is merely a 'giant tent with removable metal poles and a large tarp cover'. At the Navy Base Revitalization Project on Noisette Blvd, Lost Trades is building a 55 ft. Searunner wooden catamaran. Lost Trades also have an interest in Viking ships, canoes, kayaks, and rowing vessels. They offer apprenticeship and international exchange programs. “We build the highest quality sailing catamarans in the world, with the lowest low-tech tools. A few circular saws, jigsaws, sanders, and drills are all we need to create the ultimate sailing machine out of wood.” The website Lost Trades is a must read for more information on their history, expeditions, films, how to apply for apprenticeship… Meanwhile’ I am continuing to enjoy my rides to and fro work, noting the oblong progress on the craftsmanship. Wondering what their research has found for the 'renewable material for use in marine grade plywood' such as 'Airheart' vs the tropical hardwood. So Readers, be sure to take a look at the progress next time you are in the area! BTW: With as much rain water as Noisette Blvd tends to harbor after every down pour, Lost Trades might want to get started on those canoes!

Saturday, February 03, 2007

Noisette Blvd Trains Ringling Bros

12:49 PM 0 Comments
Exit the former Navy base, recently erected Riverfront Park – turn right onto N. Hobson Ave following the sharp left curve, then immediately yield right onto Noisette Blvd. Rapidly approach the set speed limit of 30 mph and you will briefly see a train sitting on the right side of the tracks. Then suddenly traffic squelches to a halt as drivers note an almost cartoon caption sign – “caution 5 miles an hour– children at play’ –. As you near the road laden train tracks, the trains have almost reluctantly split, allowing traffic to cross the trendy fishing bridge. However, promptly caution for there atop the bridge stands another cartoonish sign “5 miles an hour– children at play’. Be aware my Dear Readers, the Ringling Bros. and Barnum/Bailey have come to town! That’s right, Ladies and Gentlemen Jan 31 - Feb 04 at the North Charleston Coliseum, The Greatest Show on Earth is in N. Charleston for our enjoyment! And on Noisette Blvd. sits their Circus bus and train! And I take great pleasure in my daily route to and fro work, noting the vehicles in front of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum/Bailey trains. Cars, trucks, motorcycles, taxis, … Knowing the Ringling Bros. and Barnum/Bailey Circus may be here to entertain the child in us all. However; for all the Ringling Bros. and Barnum/Bailey have always given us, it is nice to be reminded that behind the mask, the makeup, the tricks, treats, feats, and rings, they are people like you and I. People with Friends and Family visiting them. People visiting our town. People with kids. And so, seeing this on Noisette Blvd., has been for me, ‘the Greatest Show On Earth’.

"The dream is as much a part of the American culture as Ringling Bros. and Barnum/ Bailey itself: to run away and join the circus. For the human performers, animal stars, and crewmembers of the two unique editions of The Greatest Show On Earth, life on the road is the best life you could imagine!

The Red Unit and Blue Unit trains criss-cross the country 11 months out of the year, logging more than 25,000 miles as they bring America's Living National Treasure to millions of families in more than 90 cities! More than a mile long, each of the privately owned Ringling Bros. and Barnum/Bailey trains is an international melting pot of cultures and skills."
Ringling Bros. and Barnum/Bailey Trains