Saturday, December 24, 2011

Bring Home Our Troops

9:29 AM 0 Comments
(A Symbol of Peace In a Time of War):

A Christmas Carmen

John Greenleaf Whittier 1807-1892


SOUND over all waters, reach out from all lands,
The chorus of voices, the clasping of hands;
Sing hymns that were sung by the stars of the morn,
Sing songs of the angels when Jesus was born!
With glad jubilations
Bring hope to the nations!
The dark night is ending and dawn has begun:
Rise, hope of the ages, arise like the sun,
All speech flow to music, all hearts beat as one!


Sing the bridal of nations! with chorals of love
Sing out the war-vulture and sing in the dove,
Till the hearts of the peoples keep time in accord,
And the voice of the world is the voice of the Lord!
Clasp hands of the nations
In strong gratulations:
The dark night is ending and dawn has begun;
Rise, hope of the ages, arise like the sun,
All speech flow to music, all hearts beat as one!


Blow, bugles of battle, the marches of peace;
East, west, north, and south let the long quarrel cease
Sing the song of great joy that the angels began,
Sing of glory to God and of good-will to man!
Hark! joining in chorus
The heavens bend o’er us!
The dark night is ending and dawn has begun;
Rise, hope of the ages, arise like the sun,
All speech flow to music, all hearts beat as one!

May this Sound echo across the Lands - Yielding World Peace in hopes of drying tears and silencing the heartfelt battle cries to Bring Home Our Troops.

Wednesday, November 09, 2011

Veterans Day

10:10 PM 0 Comments
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: "To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…"

An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday—a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nation’s history; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legislation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

Later that same year, on October 8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first "Veterans Day Proclamation" which stated: "In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible."
pamcleague.org: Veterans and their Families have already sacrificed well above and beyond what most citizens endure for their nation—enormous life-changing sacrifices.
As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. ~John Fitzgerald Kennedy
brotherswar.com: The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature." -President Abraham Lincoln

Related Posts:
Thank A Soldier
Influential Women In The Military
The Flower of Remembrance

Thank A Soldier

10:07 PM 0 Comments

the gratitude campaign (short)

The below was emailed to me:
From KING 5 News:

----- Original Message -----
From: *@*
To: nomdeplumethepoetress@gmail.com
Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2008 9:50 AM
Subject: king5.com article from *

* [*@*] has sent you a story from king5.com.
(Page at: http://www.king5.com/localnews/stories/NW_092307WAB_gratitude_campaign_SW.102c1d0ba.html)

Seattle man starts 'Gratitude Campaign' to thank soldiers
05:51 PM PDT on Sunday, September 23, 2007

By DEBORAH FELDMAN / KING 5 News

[SEATTLE - What began as a simple idea to say thank you to soldiers he passed on the street, has blossomed into a full scale campaign for Seattlite Scott Truitt.

He says many Americans want to express their gratitude to members of our military, but most aren't really sure how to proceed.

"I think there's a lot of politics wrapped around the military and that can get confusing for a lot of people," he said.

Both Truitt's father and father-in-law spent decades in the military, but even so, he realizes approaching strangers can be a little awkward at times.

"For several years I've been walking up and saying thank you to them when I've see them and sometimes its a really comfortable situation, and sometimes its not so comfortable," he said.

So he decided it would be nice to simply have a gesture to say thank you quickly and comfortably.

"The sign language sign for thank you starts at the chin and we thought geez, if you don't know what this means, you might not take it kindly. And that's certainly not the message we wanted to send," he said.

After a little research, he came up with a new idea.

"The gesture starts with your hand on your heart as if you're about to do the Pledge of Allegiance. And then you just bring the hand down and out in front of you. It actually means thank you from the bottom of my heart," he said.

Truitt hopes his Gratitude Campaign will spread across the country, and says even if soldiers don't know exactly what the gesture means, they'll realize if it originates on the heart, its got to be good.

Truitt hopes his video will continue to be shown at the start of every home Seahawks game this season.]

The Gratitude Campaign

Do You Know the Sign?



I'd like to also add a BIG Thank You to all Military Men and Women!

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Friday, June 24, 2011

Is God To Blame?

6:40 PM 0 Comments
Is it better to believe there is a God then to die and discover there is a Hell? Maybe the question isn't, is there a God, rather who is God. Strip the disguises from any Holiday Mascot and what is left is the Spirit of the Holiday. Be that spirit ‘Bah, Hum Bug’ or Merry Happy Holiday. Strip all the Religions of their ideas about whom and how God is, what’s left is the Spirit of Hope nurtured by blind faith. And what is hope but a synonymic word for optimistic anticipated expectations. Whilst faith is the blindfold we entrust to guide the subconscious, while our consciousness is busily awake. Kinda like how some drive a car while shaving, makeuping, eat, drink, smoking, while talkin’ on a cell phone. But the question here is why. Why death, suffering, diseases, etc.? It is easier to blame a God that may or may not exist. Much as a poor child may curse Santa Clause for not bring presents. Sadly, those whom for example, pass away painfully from cancer, God of any concept should not be the blame. Sure God is an easy enough target. However; it is humans who made the chemicals that cause such dis-ease. Humans invent cars; many automobiles tragically take the lives of numerous people. Drunk driving killers, humans invented alcohol. And so on and so on. For whom ever made Earth, other planets, stars, people…, only made the basics. It is humans who combined the ingredients. Then blame the damn Maker for giving humans brains! Oh my, if a tree begets an acorn and that acorn grows into a mighty tree that Mother Nature one day crushes upon your residence, whom is to blame? The Maker, the tree, the acorn, Mother Nature, you for your choice of residency…? That is the age old question of our generation. If a gun kills an innocent person, who is to blame? The gun manufactures, the bullet producers, the gunpowder providers..? If a video game leads to violence, who is at fault? The video industry, the animator… Unfortunately, there will never be enough blame to go around for everyone and everything. My Fellow Readers, we could go on and on with your questions about “the ill fates of society and people” The main misgiving however; is your pain. We may not know the whys until we ourselves meet our destination and whatever that holds. Rather it be heaven or hell or merely particles of atomically ions to be recycled back into the universe. Meanwhile; if death crushes the heart, ache damn it, ache. It hurts. It’s not fair. Next, cherish those memories for they are the healing threads for any shattered heart. Then at last, celebrate life. Instead of grieving the date of loss, light a candle on the persons’ birthday, shouting– I’m glad you were born! For in your birth I got to know you, love you. And because you lived, I have the best memories I may of never had, had you not of been born.

(I once posted this as a comment on a fellow blogger post; today, the world is much the same-wondering whom to blame and what to do. So I felt a need to post this comment here. Hope it helps someone.)

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Cheyenne Gemma Her Words and Poems

11:39 AM 5 Comments
From the Portsmouth Herald|Seacoastonline.com :


Speech pathologist Lauren Koczarski and Cheyenne Gemma in the WSCA Portsmouth Community Radio studio. Photo by Sisay Sabera

features@seacoastonline.com
March 17, 2011 2:00 AM

On March 8 our radio show, "Don't Dis My Ability," heard on Portsmouth Community Radio 106.1 FM every other Tuesday from 3:30 to 4:15 p.m. was honored by the presence of a fine young writer.

I had sent out a request through my network of friends that our show was looking for a poet who could express what it was like living with a disability. On Tuesday, a poet and writer, 13-year-old Cheyenne Gemma, of Raymond, came to the radio station with her entourage of grandparents and speech pathologist. We were told ahead of time that she did not like people talking for her, over her and about her. She made it known that she had a voice, even though it came through an electronic communicator, and she knew how to use it — thank you very much!

So, I'm not going to do that and incur her wrath. Her grandmother and I worked together weeks before the interview to fashion the questions that were then answered by Cheyenne. The next step was to create a script and program her answers into her electronic communicator.

Here is Cheyenne in her own words:

Question: How do you feel not being able to speak?

Cheyenne: Who knows what it feels like not to talk? Shut out of the world, and all alone. Not being able to share your thoughts, only listening to others talk about you. I want to cry and tell them how they hurt me. Words are wonderful; they should make me feel alive. I want to tell everyone how they make me feel. I wish I felt good about myself.

Telephone

Please let me talk on the phone...;
Happy even though no one is home.
Oh, it would be so much fun!
Not alone, just to talk to someone.
Even the recording would satisfy me!

Question: When did you first realize you could write poetry?

Answer: When I first started typing — my mind works best in rhythmic patterns. The music is like poetry with beats and waves. Nature inspires me. It's so beautiful and I see beauty in words.

If I could

If I could I would run and play outside.
I want to touch the trees.
I want to shake hands with the trees.
I would roll in the grass.
I would hold the earth close to me.
I would sing with the birds.
I would sing praises to Jesus.
I would draw in the sky.
I would draw beautiful rainbows.
I would kiss the flowers.
I would love to play with the flowers.
If I could.

The next day I thought of this saying. "Dost thou reckon thyself only a puny form when within thee the universe is folded."-Baha'u'llah, 1817-1892.

Everyone has some indispensable unique contribution to make in the world. You have it, I have it, and certainly Cheyenne has it. Believe it. If I didn't know it before I met Cheyenne Gemma, I certainly know it now.

click to learn more about Cheyenne Gemma: A Very Powerful Show of Creativity and Courage – … A Young Lady You Won’t Forget: ("Cheyenne has written a song that one of her aides has set to music and sings...") 

Go&Do:

WHAT: Don't Dis My Ability radio show
WHEN: Every other Tuesday, 3:30-4:15 p.m.
WHERE: Portsmouth Community Radio 106.1 FM, 909 Islington St, Suite 1, Portsmouth

*Permission to repost article granted by: J.L. Stevens, Spotlight Editor

Ronnie Tomanio is the creator and co-host of Don't Dis My Ability radio show:

The Don't Dis My Ability radio show was Ron Tomanio’s brainchild. “I’m always looking for interesting things for people I work with to do during the day,” he explains. “I kept driving past the sign for the radio station in Portsmouth. One day I stopped in and looked at the program schedule. I said to the manager, ‘There’s no program here about people with disabilities.’ "You’re right, that’s a good idea! We can train you if you’d like to create a program." ... The show went on air on November 3. Guests have included an architect recovering from a stroke, the director of the Disability Rights Center, a hand surgeon, and John Eubanks’service coordinator Alicia. {click to read full article}

Personal note from Binding Ink.Org Writer –Jeane M. Culp (ndpthepoetress): Cheyeanne Gemma, Thank you for introducing yourself and sharing your talent on the ‘Don't Dis My Ability’ radio show. I am in awe of your writing and admire your intelligent mature intellect and insightfulness.